Le Felizianerie – Eclectic Dining in the Shadow of the Vatican


Le Felizianerie… a new find on my Roman dining circuit

I’ve spent a lot of time in Rome, and I have at least a half dozen restaurants there that I adore. But things happen: you can’t get a reservation, the place you love is closed, or in my case recently, I was staying in a part of the city that was far from my usual haunts. So I decided it was time to venture out and try a new place. With a little help from tripadvisor.com, I found a restaurant that got rave reviews, sounded really interesting and when I searched the map I discovered that it was literally a block from the apartment where I was staying. It was a chilly, rainy night, so a well-recommended restaurant just a stone’s throw from my place sounded like the perfect solution to my “Where do I eat tonight?” quandary. Off I went to a place called, Le Felizianerie.

This is a rather small, lively restaurant located less than a couple blocks from the Vatican Walls on Via Candia. As I arrived, several English-speaking folks were leaving and when I asked how they’d enjoyed their meal, they exuberantly described everything they’d tried and said that this had been their third visit in a week. That boded well. Inside, the décor was colorful and bright, and I was quickly greeted and seated at a perfect table by the window.


The bright and cheery interior.

I’d read that the restaurant specialized in Italian with a bit of Asian fusion, and had trouble imagining just what that would look like. But one of the first things that caught my eye on the menu was the Salmon Teriyaki appetizer. I ordered it and it was both a visual work of art as well as one of the most delicious dishes I have ever tried. Beautiful chunks of teriyaki salmon were “decorated” with fresh ginger, lemon, olives, Asian cabbage, crispy oven-dried seaweed, and dabs of citrus mayo for dipping. It was refreshing, generously portioned and an almost startling mix of textures and flavors. A+!


Salmon Teriyaki, Roman Style

One of my favorite pasta preparations is a typically Roman dish called  all’amatraciana, a slightly spicy and hearty sauce made from guanciale (a sort of bacon made from pork cheek), tomatoes, onion and pecorino cheese. I usually see it served with bucatini pasta, a very thick spaghetti noodle that I would never order on a first date or if wearing any clothes I treasure, as it is almost impossible to twirl the broad noodles around one’s fork without splattering sauce in all directions! Well, Le Felizianerie featured an amatraciana dish served with paccheri, a large tube-shaped pasta that captures sauces much more effectively. I ordered that, and I have to say that this was hands down the most delicious version of this dish that I’ve had anywhere in Italy.  Another A+.


Best. Amatraciana. Ever.

I also had a refreshing glass of the house prosecco and though I was curious about dessert, I simply did not have room for it. But I’m not lamenting that decision, as I know that I’ll come back here on my next trip to Rome with a bigger appetite and ready to sample more from the menu of this great new find!  Check them out!  Buon Appetito!


American Roadtrip, Part III: New England

I was born and raised in New Bedford, Massachusetts, about an hour south of Boston and a half an hour east of Providence, Rhode Island. Although I left New England in 1980 for graduate school in Virginia and subsequently southern California, it is still “home” to me, and I make visits back there several times a year, with a cross country road trip every summer and every Christmas. Because I have made the trip so many times, I begin to feel like I’m already on home turf by the time I reach Pennsylvania, but crossing the border from New York into Connecticut, one of the six New England states, means I’m “home”.

You CAN get there from here! Read on!

American Roadtrip, Part II: The South

After my first visit south of the Mason-Dixon line some 40 years ago, I joked that now I understood the reason that the South lost the Civil War. They were obviously too full from all their amazing foods to be able to fight at full effectiveness. Despite the fact that I was born a Yankee, I lived in Virginia for a couple of years and I’ve traveled through the southern states often. From the Carolinas to Texas, I find the people to be among the warmest, most welcoming and polite I’ve ever encountered.


Magnolia Plantation outside Charleston, South Carolina

Y’all read more now, hear?

You Don’t Have to Take Route 66 to Get Your Kicks! American Roadtrip, Part I: The Southwest

“Get Your Kicks on Route 66” is a popular refrain from the 1946 song that was made famous by Nat King Cole and subsequently was recorded by dozens of other artists including Chuck Berry, Asleep at the Wheel, and Michael Martin Murphy. While vestiges of the old highway that wound “from Chicago to L.A.” still remain (notably in the California desert and various parts of New Mexico and Oklahoma), much of it has been replaced by Interstate 40. But don’t despair, you can get your kicks on any number of highways that crisscross the U.S. You just have to take that long dreamed about road trip!

The Burr Trail, a scenic but rugged drive off Highway 12 near Boulder, Utah

Let’s hit the road! Read More:

A Divine Taste of Tuscany at Tuscany Divine

Tuscany is undoubtedly one of the most popular and well-loved regions of Italy, but it also has a reputation for being expensive and a bit pretentious. However, if you have a car and want a fantastic taste of Tuscan cuisine at an unbelievably reasonable price, with friendly and attentive service, I have just the place for you. Set your GPS for the rather obscure town of Chiusi and a restaurant called Tuscany Divine.


Let the Divine feast begin:

A Little Piece of Italy in San Francisco: E` Tutto Qua

For anyone who has traveled to Italy and craves the same quality of food and attentive service that one so often finds there, don’t worry: you can experience some of the best Italian food west of Italy in San Francisco’s North Beach neighborhood at a restaurant called, E` Tutto Qua, which translates to “It’s All Here”. Owner Enzo Pellico has brought his recipes (and several of his family members) from Italy and anyone who visits his warm, energetic restaurant will feel transported to Rome for the evening.  I first visited E` Tutto Qua about 6 or 7 years ago, and it immediately became, and has remained one of my top two or three restaurants in San Francisco.

Vieni con me a E` Tutto Qua

Cucineria Pane Vino & Zucchero, Montepulciano

Every visit to Italy that I make requires careful planning to be sure I’m able to dine at all of my tried and true favorite restaurants. Still, I always enjoy finding a new place to add to my list and on a recent trip to Tuscany I had one of the best dining experiences ever at a restaurant called Pane, Vino & Zucchero, which means Bread, Wine and Sugar. That sounded like a winning combination to me, and I am so glad I discovered this place!


Antipasto of cheese, meat and fruits

Read more about Pane Vino & Zucchero: